Monday, 22 June 2009

Scott Wiseman / Bob Dylan - "Remember Me (When the Candle Lights Are Gleaming)"




The sweetest songs belong to lovers in the gloaming. The sweetest days are days that used to be.

This song was written in 1939 when LuLu Belle and I spent a year at radio station WLW, Cincinnati. In our guest room at home when I was a child there was a fancy old cup and saucer which sat on the dresser.

The phrase "Remember Me" was on the cup in fancy gold lettering. We children were not allowed to touch this memento of the sentimental Gay Nineties, somehow connected with the courtship of Mother and Dad.

Feeling a bit homesick and sentimental during the bustle of radio shows and road trips, I "made up" the song while riding in the car to personal appearance jobs. The lyric was not intended to apply to any particular person.

- Scott Wiseman: Letters to Dorothy Horstman, Apr 8/Aug 8, 1973;
reprinted in Dorothy Horstman, Sing Your Heart Out, Country Boy, New York, 1976, p. 191.
(via bobdylanroots.com).


"Remember Me (When the Candle Lights Are Gleaming)" is another classic song commandeered by "Magpie" Bob Dylan! Although never released by Bob on an official album, his adapted folkier version of the song was performed on the famous “East Orange Tape” bootleg (early 1961), and in an unreleased fragment from the seminal "Don’t Look Back" (1965) material (see below).

The original version of this beautiful song was written by the relatively unknown Carolina Country crooner Scott Wiseman.

Scott Greene Wiseman (November 8, 1908 - January 31, 1981) hailed from a rustic farm homeland in the "Land of the Sky" near Asheville, North Carolina. Besides being a musician, Scott also held a college degree and specialised in the teaching of literature.

Aside from "Remember Me (When the Candle Lights Are Gleaming)", Wiseman's perhaps best known for his songs "Mountain Dew", "Have I Told You Lately That I Love You?", "Wonder Valley," and "Great Grandad."

Scott Wiseman's marriage to Myrtle Cooper (aka "Lulu Belle") led to the formation of the "Lulu Belle and Scotty" duo, one of country and western music's famous partnerships of the 1930s and 1940s, when they became known as "The Sweethearts of Country Music."

Their best known numbers were "Have I Told You Lately That I Love You?," - which became one of the first country songs to attract major attention in pop circles and was recorded by many artists in both genres - as well as the novelty number "Does Your Chewing Gum Lose It's Flavor On The Bedpost?"

The couple retired from show business in 1958, except for occasional appearances, going on to new careers in teaching (Wiseman) and politics (Cooper). Cooper served two terms in the North Carolina House of Representatives as the Democratic representative for three counties.

Scott was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1971.

Scott Wiseman died in 1981 of a heart attack in Gainesville, Florida. Cooper later married Ernest Stamey in 1983, and in 1985 recorded her first album in 20 years for a small traditional music label.

"Remember Me (When the Candle Lights Are Gleaming)" - as well as being recorded by Lulu Belle & Scotty was later covered by Ernest Tubb, Tommy Faile, Roy Acuff and Willie Nelson, amongst others.







VERSION #1 (original Scott Wiseman lyrics)

CHORUS:
Remember me when the candle lights are gleaming,
Remember me at the close of a long, long day.
It would be so sweet when all alone I'm dreaming
Just to know you still remember me.
The sweetest songs belong to lovers in the gloaming,
The sweetest days are days that used to be.
The saddest words I ever heard were words of parting
When you said "Sweetheart, remember me."

You told me once that you were mine alone forever
And I was yours till the end of eternity.
But all those vows are broken now, and we will never
Be the same except in memory.

A brighter face may take my place when we're apart, dear,
A sweeter smile, a love more bold and free.
But in the end, fair weather friends may break your heart, dear.
If they do, sweetheart, remember me.


© 1946 Vogue Music, Inc., Santa Monica, CA.




Ernest Tubb's version of Scott Wiseman's original "Remember Me (When the Candle Lights Are Gleaming)"




tx oldcountrytunes









VERSION #2 (as adapted by Bob Dylan)

The sweetest songs are sung by lovers in the moonlight,
The sweetest days are the days that used to be.
The saddest words I ever heard were words of parting
When you said "Sweetheart, remember me."

CHORUS:
Remember me when the candle lights are gleamin',
Remember me at the close of a long, long day.
Just be so sweet when all alone you're dreamin'
Just to know you still remember me.

A brighter face may take my place when we're apart, dear,
A brighter smile an' a love more bold and free.
But in the end, fair weather friends may break your heart, dear.
An' if they do, sweetheart, remember me.

CHORUS:
Remember me when the candle lights are gleamin',
Remember me at the close of a long, long day.
Just to be so sweet when all alone you're dreamin'
Just to know you still remember me.

You told me once you were mine alone forever,
You were mine till the end of eternity.
But now it's over, dear, and we can never
Be the same except in memory.

CHORUS:
Remember me when the candle lights are gleamin',
Remember me at the close of a long, long day.
Just be so sweet when all alone you're dreamin'
Just to know you still remember me.





Dylan and Joan Baez performing Bob's version of "Remember Me (When the Candle Lights are Gleaming)" during the famous 1965 tour of England.








tx devilthebeats


Dylan's version of "Remember Me (When the Candle Lights are Gleaming)" from the “East Orange Tape” bootleg.








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